Print Collection - An Infrared View of the Galaxy
$10.00 Off Prints Today! TAKETENOFF

TAKE $10 OFF PRINTS

Take $10 OFF orders over $35.00 TODAY! Be sure to use code: TAKETENOFF at checkout.

1-716-222-2089

Customer Login 1.716.222.2089

Select a room
Select a room color

An Infrared View of the Galaxy

Framed Size:
Print Size:
Frame Color:
Frame Style: 1 1/4 inch frame of the highest quality American hardwoods sourced from a factory which practices sustainable harvesting of forests.
Matted:
6 Ply Conservation: Bright White conservation mat for an elegant presentation of your artwork.
Clear Glass: Our glass provides some UV protection. Keep art out of direct sunlight.
$35.99

We stand behind every sale with a 100% Customer Satisfaction Guarantee. 

If you are not completely satisfied with your purchase for any reason, return your order to us in the original packaging within 30 days of receipt and we will give you a full refund of your product costs or issue a free replacement of a damaged product in transit to you.

Refunds do not include shipping costs.


An Infrared View of the Galaxy

$16.99 229.99
Love your Print: With our 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Description
Quality Prints
Print Sizes
Reviews

This composite color infrared image of the center of our Milky Way galaxy reveals a new population of massive stars and new details in complex structures in the hot ionized gas swirling around the central 300 light-years. This sweeping panorama is the sharpest infrared picture ever made of the Galactic core and offers a laboratory for how massive stars form and influence their environment in the often violent nuclear regions of other galaxies.

This view combines the sharp imaging of the Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) with color imagery from a previous Spitzer Space Telescope survey done with its Infrared Astronomy Camera (IRAC). The Galactic core is obscured in visible light by intervening dust clouds, but infrared light penetrates the dust. NICMOS shows a large number of these massive stars distributed throughout the region. A new finding is that astronomers now see that the massive stars are not confined to one of the three known clusters of massive stars in the Galactic Center, known as the Central cluster, the Arches cluster, and the Quintuplet cluster. These three clusters are easily seen as tight concentrations of bright, massive stars in the NICMOS image. The distributed stars may have formed in isolation, or they may have originated in clusters that have been disrupted by strong gravitational tidal forces. The winds and radiation from these stars form the complex structures seen in the core, and in some cases, they may be triggering new generations of stars. The NICMOS mosaic required 144 Hubble orbits to make 2,304 science exposures from Feb. 22 and June 5, 2008. Image Credits: Hubble: NASA, ESA, and Q.D. Wang (University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Spitzer: NASA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and S. Stolovy (Spitzer Science Center/Caltech)

åÊ

All prints are made with the finest quality Digital Giclée printing using 12 color archival inks. We have chosen a 300gsm Rag Matt finish paper with no "Optical Brightners" to extend the life of your print.

Great care has been taken to reproduce this image for you. We stand behind the quality of your print with a 100% customer satisfaction guarantee.
You Also May Like From This Collection
Sale Promo
An Infrared View of the Galaxy

This composite color infrared image of the center of our Milky Way galaxy reveals a new population of massive stars and new details in complex structures in the hot ionized gas swirling around the central 300 light-years. This sweeping panorama is the sharpest infrared picture ever made of the Galactic core and offers a laboratory for how massive stars form and influence their environment in the often violent nuclear regions of other galaxies.

This view combines the sharp imaging of the Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) with color imagery from a previous Spitzer Space Telescope survey done with its Infrared Astronomy Camera (IRAC). The Galactic core is obscured in visible light by intervening dust clouds, but infrared light penetrates the dust. NICMOS shows a large number of these massive stars distributed throughout the region. A new finding is that astronomers now see that the massive stars are not confined to one of the three known clusters of massive stars in the Galactic Center, known as the Central cluster, the Arches cluster, and the Quintuplet cluster. These three clusters are easily seen as tight concentrations of bright, massive stars in the NICMOS image. The distributed stars may have formed in isolation, or they may have originated in clusters that have been disrupted by strong gravitational tidal forces. The winds and radiation from these stars form the complex structures seen in the core, and in some cases, they may be triggering new generations of stars. The NICMOS mosaic required 144 Hubble orbits to make 2,304 science exposures from Feb. 22 and June 5, 2008. Image Credits: Hubble: NASA, ESA, and Q.D. Wang (University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Spitzer: NASA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and S. Stolovy (Spitzer Science Center/Caltech)

åÊ

0 stars, based on 0 reviews 1699
printcollection.myshopify.com printcollection.myshopify.com
Rated 5/5 based on 32 customer reviews